Ganesha Park, Nakhon Nayok, Thailand

Ganesha is called Phra Pikanet or Phra Phikanesuan in Thai. Ganesha Park in Nakhon Nayok has two of the largest Ganesha statues in Thailand. The official name is Utthyan Ganesha Temple, Nakhon Nayok, Thailand. The image below is of a reclining Ganesha and is the largest of the two statues.

Ganesha shrine and park, Nakhon Nayok, Thailand
Ganesha shrine and park, Nakhon Nayok, Thailand

The figure below shows Ganesha in a sitting position. He is holding his broken tusk in one hand. In his other hands he has what appears to be a Sai, an ancient weapon,  a rope noose and a bowl. In front of the sitting Ganesha is a mouse.

Ganesha shrine and park, Nakhon Nayok, Thailand
Ganesha shrine and park, Nakhon Nayok, Thailand

It is said that Ganesha uses the mouse  to communicate with his followers. Ganesha park is an impressive tribute to the Hindu God Ganesha. The second figure is a reclining Ganesha. Although Ganesha is a Hindu God he is also revered by Thai Buddhists.

Ganesha shrine and park, Nakhon Nayok, Thailand
Ganesha shrine and park, Nakhon Nayok, Thailand
Devotees light prayer incense during the 6th Ganesha Festival at Utthyan Ganesha Temple, Nakhon Nayok, Thailand.
Devotees light prayer incense during the 6th Ganesha Festival at Utthyan Ganesha Temple, Nakhon Nayok, Thailand.

I first visited the park in 2011 when it was still under construction and have made several visits since, as it is close to mo home in Nakhon Nayok, Thailand.

Devotees light prayer incense during the 6th Ganesha Festival at Utthyan Ganesha Temple, Nakhon Nayok, Thailand.
Devotees light prayer incense during the 6th Ganesha Festival at Utthyan Ganesha Temple, Nakhon Nayok, Thailand.

I have been to two festivals at this park, the 6th and 7th Ganesha Festival. The Ganesha Festivals are annual events and take place at several locations in Thailand, usually lasting from 3 days to a week. Devotees come to pray, and carry a statue of Ganesha to the river to give him his annual blessing. The procession from the temple to the river, in the ones I attended, were quite large, and devotees traveled a couple of miles to the river carrying a statue of Ganesha.

Devotees do their best to touch a statue of Ganesha before it is given a bath in the river at the 6th Ganesha Festival at Utthyan Ganesha Temple, Nakhon Nayok, Thailand.
Devotees do their best to touch a statue of Ganesha before it is given a bath in the river at the 6th Ganesha Festival at Utthyan Ganesha Temple, Nakhon Nayok, Thailand.
A Thai Buddhist monk blesses the participants at the 6th Ganesha Festival at Utthyan Ganesha Temple, Nakhon Nayok, Thailand.
A Thai Buddhist monk blesses the participants at the 6th Ganesha Festival at Utthyan Ganesha Temple, Nakhon Nayok, Thailand.
A Thai Buddhist monk blesses the participants at the 6th Ganesha Festival at Utthyan Ganesha Temple, Nakhon Nayok, Thailand.
A man performs with larges trays at the 6th Ganesha Festival at Utthyan Ganesha Temple, Nakhon Nayok, Thailand.
The highlight of the last day of the festival is to bring a Statue Ganesha to the river and give it a bath. At the 6th Ganesha Festival at Utthyan Ganesha Temple in Nakhon Nayok, Thailand.
The highlight of the last day of the festival is to bring a Statue Ganesha to the river and give it a bath. At the 6th Ganesha Festival at Utthyan Ganesha Temple in Nakhon Nayok, Thailand.
Ganesha shrine and park, Nakhon Nayok, Thailand
Ganesha shrine and park, Nakhon Nayok, Thailand.

The festival has many activities going on over the 3 to 5 days of the event, and I found it very interesting, the leaders and people at the events were very friendly and quite helpful. I had originally planned to visit just one day, but ended up going back for all 3 days, and attended the event 2 years in a row. I would say, it’s well worth your time and effort to attend this event.

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